Speak with one of our advisors: 0800 085 6616 or
 

BreastHealth UK

March, 2020

Dear Client

We would like to reassure you about the safety of our at-home cancer screening services and risk assessments in light of the COVID-19 outbreak.  All of our testing kits for bowel, cervical, lung and prostate cancer screening are sent to your home and therefore, do not require you to attend an outpatient setting or hospital.  MyBreastRisk is also a home testing kit to provide you with a personal breast cancer risk assessment.  We are in continued contact with our laboratory and all necessary measures are in place to ensure that we can continue to process and deliver results.  With NHS cancer services now beginning to gather momentum, those patients with an abnormal test result will have the option to have further investigations in the NHS or private sector, accepting that there may be a slight delay to access the NHS. If you would like to speak to us please call 0800 085 6663.

We would also like to reassure you about the safety of our breast, prostate and skin diagnostic pathways in light of the COVID-19 outbreak. We are working very closely with our Consultants and Specialist Nurses to ensure that all necessary Government advice is being followed. As a result of this, we continue to be able to provide rapid access into our national network of breast, skin and prostate pathways. If you have travelled overseas, have a fever of at least 37.8 degrees Celsius, have developed a new, dry persistent cough, or lost your sense of smell and taste please do not attend your appointment and contact our team who will be happy to reschedule for you. If you would like to speak to us please call 0800 085 6663.

August, 2019

OneStop Breast

Fast track diagnostic clinics for women of any age who have noticed recent changes in their breasts, such as a breast lump, breast pain, discharge or nipple inverion. These OneStop Breast clinics include private breast screening with triple assessment, providing thorough and accurate diagnosis of breast cancer. Rapid access appointments with highly experienced breast cancer specialists in clinic locations nationwide, help to reduce time to diagnosis. This ensures that any treatment needed can be started straight away.

 

Find out more

 

MyBreastRisk

Discover your personal risk of developing breast cancer from your DNA. An innovative test that combines your family history, lifestyle and genetics for women aged 30+. MyBreastRisk is a simple, one-off, at-home saliva collection kit that provides you with your results and personalised breast cancer screening programme within 8 weeks of our laboratory receiving your sample.

 

Find out more

 

Mammograms

BreastHealth UK offers private mammograms for breast cancer diagnosis. Mammograms involve taking an x-ray picture of each breast and can detect cancer at an early stage before changes can be felt in the breast by you or your doctor. Mammography can reduce the time to diagnosis, ensuring any treatment that is needed can be started straight away. Mammography can usually be perfomed on women from the age of 40 but as early as age 35 depending on the level of risk.

 

Find out more

January, 2019

November, 2018

Amazing service - quick, and a comfortable experience and the ladies were so good, and lovely.

September, 2018

November, 2017

Absolutely fantastic and lovely staff from start to finish! Quick and efficient service. Ms Chaudhry made me feel listened to and at ease.

September, 2017

What is MyBreastRisk?

MyBreastRisk is the first commercially available test that combines inherited, genetic and lifestyle factors to estimate a woman’s personal lifetime risk of developing breast cancer.

How is my genetic risk calculated?

MyBreastRisk includes an at-home saliva DNA test that measures 77 tiny errors in DNA (SNPs – Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) that each have a low impact on breast cancer risk but are powerful in combination. The more SNPs you have, the higher your breast cancer risk.

How is my family history and lifestyle risk calculated?

MyBreastRisk includes the Tyrer-Cuzick family history and lifestyle questionnaire to estimate your personal lifetime risk of developing breast cancer.

Does it matter if I don’t know my family history?

No. You can have the DNA test on its own to estimate your risk of developing breast cancer.

Why should I have MyBreastRisk?

The test will allow you to have a more personalised breast screening programme that is tailored to your age and underlying risk. If you are at higher risk, you can start breast screening at a younger age, or have more intense screening. The test can also help identify those women who can be treated with drugs like Tamoxifen to reduce their breast cancer risk.

How old do I have to be to have MyBreastRisk?

The test is routinely available to women aged 30+ to ensure that screening is available if you are found to be at high risk.

How soon will I receive my result?

Your result will usually be available within 8 weeks of receiving your DNA sample.

How will I know which breast screening is best for me?

When we write to you with the results of MyBreastRisk, we will advise you on the optimal breast screening programme based on your risk, age and current NICE guidelines. BreastHealth UK can help you manage your breast screening programme in the private sector.

If I am at high risk, can I be seen in the NHS?

Current NICE guidelines advise that women at moderate or high risk of developing breast cancer are eligible for additional breast screening within the NHS. Please take your results letter to the GP to ask for a referral letter.

August, 2017

MyBreastRisk

What is MyBreastRisk?

MyBreastRisk is an innovative yet affordable at-home test to estimate your personal lifetime breast cancer risk. It is the first commercially available test to combine inherited, genetic and lifestyle factors.

For women who do not know their medical family history, our simple saliva DNA test provides an excellent alternative way to discover your breast cancer risk. 

What does MyBreastRisk include?

Saliva DNA test Online breast cancer risk assessment questionnaire Free genetic counselling for women at high risk

Key benefits:

Affordable, at-home test Suitable for women aged 30+  Personalised breast screening programme Single lifetime assessment allows you to take control of your breast cancer risk

How much does it cost?

MyBreastRisk kit - £295

Order now

"Discover your personal breast cancer risk with this innovative at-home saliva DNA test." Professor Gordon Wishart, Consultant Breast Surgeon

 

Important Note

For some women a genetic assessment +/- BRCA 1 and BRCA2 testing may be more appropriate than MyBreastRisk. Genetic assessment is recommended for people with a personal  or family history of:

Known BRCA mutation Male breast cancer Ovarian cancer Bilateral breast cancer (breast cancer in both breasts) Triple negative breast cancer Jewish ancestry and breast or ovarian cancer Unusual cancers such as sarcoma, childhood cancer, brain cancer

 More information can be found on our GeneHealth UK website

 

October, 2016

Appointment Based Cancellations

We are pleased to cancel and re-schedule without penalty or administration fees, up to 24 hours before your appointment. However, less than 24 hours’ notice of cancellation, re-scheduling or non-attendance on the day, does incur a 100% cancellation fee, as we will be unable to re-use the time to support other clients. If an appointment is cancelled more than 3 times, Check4Cancer reserves the right not to offer an alternative appointment.

MyBreastRisk

MyBreastRisk at-home testing kits are non-refundable and cannot be returned once dispatched. If a replacement kit is needed for whatever reason it will be charged at £20.

October, 2016

MyBreastRisk at-home testing kits are non-refundable and cannot be returned once dispatched. If a replacement kit is needed for whatever reason it will be charged at £20.

October, 2016

ONCOassist app adds PREDICT algorithm, licensed from Cambridge Enterprise, to help doctors make critical treatment decisions following breast cancer surgery

Chief Medical Officer at Check4Cancer, Prof Gordon Wishart led a team of clinicians and scientists to develop the PREDICT survival and treatment benefit model.

June, 2016

Thought everyone I dealt with was very nice and reassuring and made the whole experience as easy as possible. 

March, 2016

Please find below a list of frequently asked questions accompanied by their solutions to any difficulties found whilst trying to view secure attached ZIP files.

How do I extract my file(s) from the ZIP file?

Some systems will have built-in programs that can extract files from a ZIP file. Some will not, but there are a variety of software programs available to download for free that are able to extract these files. Please view the list below for the appropriate solution for your system.

Desktop & Laptop Mac Secondary-click the ZIP file, then open the file with Archive Utility. Windows Right-click the ZIP file, click Extract All, and then follow the instructions. Tablet & Mobile Android In order to extract your files from the ZIP file, please download OfficeSuite here and open the file using this program. iPad & iPhone In order to extract your files from the ZIP file, please download iZip here and open the file using this program. Windows In order to extract your files from the ZIP file, please download Archiver here and open the file using this program. How do I open my PDF file?

If there is any difficulty found in attempting to view the attached document(s), your system may not have an appropriate document viewer installed. The most popular PDF file viewer is Adobe Acrobat Reader, please view the list below for links to download this free software.

Desktop & Laptop Mac & Windows In order to view your encrypted PDF file, please download Adobe Acrobat Reader here and then open your file. Tablet & Mobile Android In order to view your encrypted PDF file, please download Adobe Acrobat Reader here and then open your file. iPad & iPhone In order to view your encrypted PDF file, please download Adobe Acrobat Reader here and then open your file. Windows In order to view your encrypted PDF file, please download Adobe Acrobat Reader here and then open your file. What is my password?

The password will be your date of birth (YYYYMMDD) followed by your postcode, all uppercase and without any spaces.

E.g. if your date of birth is the 24th July 1966 and your postcode is NW12 3XX then your password would be 19660724NW123XX

This password is case sensitive.

I have done the above and I still cannot access my file(s), what do I do?

Please contact us on 0800 085 6616.

end faq

September, 2015

June, 2015

June, 2015

Details to come.

At BreastHealth UK we are keen that you have as many facts as possible before taking a decision to have early detection of cancer services. We hope that you will find the table of pros and cons of cancer screening below a useful tool in coming to that decision.

Pros Cons Cancer screening may give you an indication of cancer before any symptoms develop. Cancer screening may find cancer at an early stage when treatment is more likely to be curative. If cancer is diagnosed at an earlier stage, treatment is more likely to be successful. Cancer screening can miss a number of cancers and provide false reassurance: no cancer screening test is 100% accurate.  Cancer screening can lead to unnecessary worry and investigations when there is no cancer present. A positive screening result may cause anxiety by diagnosing a slow-growing tumour that may never cause any harm or symptoms.

Please click on the links below to find lists of frequently asked questions and answers.

Mammography MyBreastRisk Breast Ultrasound General Breast Cancer Questions

Click here to return to the home page

Breast MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) is a very specialised non-invasive scan that uses magnetic fields to determine what the inside of the breast looks like. The scan does not involve radiation but requires a patient to lie flat on their stomach for up to one hour in the scanner. Although the scan is very sensitive at detecting breast cancer it can also give rise to a number of uncertain findings that may require additional investigation. As a result MRI is currently only recommended for breast screening in women with a very strong family history of breast cancer or as an additional investigation in women with clinical or mammographic abnormalities.

Women with a strong family history of breast cancer are eligible for MRI screening on the advice of one of our Clinical Directors.

For more information, please view our breast MRI FAQ page.

Ultrasound sends harmless high-frequency sound waves through your breast and converts them into images on a screen. Ultrasound is not a stand-alone screening test for breast cancer but is used as a complementary tool. If an abnormality is seen on mammography, or felt by clinical examination, ultrasound is the best way to find out if the abnormality is solid (such as a benign fibroadenoma, or breast cancer) or fluid-filled (such as a benign cyst).

Ultrasound can also be used to take a targeted biopsy from any solid lump within your breast. It cannot determine whether a solid lump is cancerous, nor can it detect calcifications (small flecks of calcium on mammography which can be associated with breast cancer). If any of your screening tests show an abnormality it is likely that a breast ultrasound will be recommended to you.

Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy

If your screening investigations show a solid lump in your breast then a targeted biopsy will be recommended to you. Ultrasound is used to guide the needle in to the lump so that a tissue sample can be obtained for analysis. Ultrasound-guided breast biopsies are far more likely to provide the correct diagnosis that those carried out by palpation only. The biopsy will be performed after injection of local anaesthesia and will take up to fifteen minutes to perform. The biopsy will be sent to the pathology laboratory for analysis and the result should be ready within five working days.

Ultrasound Guided Aspiration

If your screening investigations show a fluid-filled cyst (benign) an ultrasound-guided breast cyst aspiration will be used to drain fluid from cysts in the breast. A radiologist does this procedure. The procedure only takes a few minutes.

For further information, please view our Breast Ultrasound FAQ page.

It is a fact that with breast cancer, early detection saves lives. The breast cancer survival rates for women with early stage breast cancer are significantly better than those with later stages of the disease. This is why BreastHealth UK have put together a comprehensive range of private breast cancer screening services to ensure any problems are detected quickly and early on.

Our key breast cancer screening services include:

BreastCheck – A risk assessment, clinical breast examination by a breast specialist nurse , advice on self-examination and a personalised breast screening programme.

OneStop Clinic – For women or men who have developed breast cancer symptoms we offer a series of tests called triple assessment that include a clinical breast examination, mammography or ultrasound and, if required, a biopsy. This gives the best chance of detecting breast cancer if it is present.

Genetic Testing – Services include BRCA1 & BRCA2 genetic testing where there is a history of breast cancer in the family, genetic counselling and risk assessment.

IVF Breast Screening – For women undergoing IVF (and therefore usually at an average age of 36) we offer a breast cancer screening service with clinical breast examination, advice on self-examination, a breast screening report and personalised breast screening programme

BreastHealth UK also offers mammograms, ultrasound and MRI screening should clinical breast examination identify issues or you would like a second opinion.

Arranging Breast Cancer Screening

If you are worried about breast cancer, whether you are displaying any symptoms or not, please contact us to arrange an appointment. Our service is fast, confidential and we will give you peace of mind that you know how to monitor your own breast health.

Breast Screening Benefits

Early detection saves lives and there is now strong evidence that breast screening using mammography leads to earlier breast cancer detection and improved survival. A recent research study has shown the risk of death from breast cancer can be reduced by almost 50% by participating in a breast screening programme. Mammography however, will not pick up all breast cancers. BreastHealth UK also offers BreastCheck to improve the sensitivity of breast screening.

It is now well recognised that breast awareness and self examination are important in maintaining breast health and bring benefits. Despite this, many women find self-examination difficult to perform or interpret. In addition a number of breast cancers missed by mammography may present as a lump or thickening on breast examination. A regular clinical breast examination by one of our breast specialist nurses provides an effective way for you to monitor early changes in your breasts and learn self-examination.

Another breast screening benefit that is often not mentioned is that early detection often means there is no need to remove the entire breast (mastectomy) and reconstructive surgery can be more successful. Macmillan Cancer state that 70% of women detected through screening have breast conserving surgery in comparison with only 55% outside of the screening programme.

BreastHealth UK is working with some of the leading breast surgeons, helping BreastHealth UK to stay at the forefront of technology and provide personalised breast health screening programmes and consultations to ensure breast screening benefits are maximised.

Participating in BreastHealth UK's breast screening programme will give you all the benefits mentioned above, a strong sense of being well looked after and peace of mind.

If you are interested in making an appointment, please call 0800 085 6616.

Please click the boxes for a description of what they are.

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Requirements

No early detection programme, including mammography, will pick up all breast cancers. If your test results are abnormal you will be eligible for referral to an NHS clinic via your GP if the abnormality is detected by breast examination or mammography.

WWW.BREASTHEALTHUK.COM

This website is owned and operated by Check4Cancer Ltd., a company registered in England and Wales under company number 8866941 and with a registered office at Lower Court 3-4, Copley Hill Business Park, Cambridge Road, Cambridge, CB22 3GN (“Check4Cancer”).

Check4Cancer is the data controller of any personal information that you submit through this website and is committed to protecting your privacy and maintaining the security of any personal information received from you.

COLLECTING YOUR PERSONAL DATA

You can access most of the pages on our website without giving us your personal information. However, you may choose to provide us with your personal information on some pages of the website, for instance by submitting patient feedback on the surgeons on the website or completing an enquiry form. When you do so, you may submit sensitive personal data relating to your health. By submitting your personal information, you consent to our use of the information (including in particular any information relating to your health) as set out in this privacy policy and this website’s terms of use [see below].

USE OF YOUR PERSONAL DATA

Check4Cancer will use any personal information you give us as set out in this policy and in the privacy statements that appear on the forms through which you submit your personal information.

Check4Cancer will use your information to give you access to secure parts of the Check4Cancer website, administer our relationship with you; and carry out statistical analysis (including but not limited to analysis of the use and access to this website).

If you give us your personal information, Check4Cancer may also from time to time contact you by mail, telephone, or email to notify you about changes to the service provided by this website and provide other information that may be of interest to you, including details about the services Check4Cancer offers. Check4Cancer will give you an opportunity to choose not to receive marketing information before you submit your personal information. You can tell us to stop sending you marketing information at any time by contacting Check4Cancer.

If you provide your consent when submitting your information, Check4Cancer may also share your information and the details you provide with the relevant surgeons and other third parties by publishing the information on this website. Check4Cancer may also disclose your information to third parties if it sells or buys any business or assets, in which case Check4Cancer may disclose your information to the prospective seller or buyer of such business or assets. Unless required to do so by law or otherwise set out in this privacy policy, Check4Cancer will not share your information with any third party.

Check4Cancer may disclose your information to its agents and service providers for the purposes set out above.

COOKIES

Check4Cancer uses a technology called "cookies" as part of a normal business procedure to track patterns of behaviour of users of this website. A cookie is an element of data that this website sends to your browser that is then stored on your system. You can set your browser to prevent this happening. Any information collected in this way can be used to identify you unless you change your browser settings.

YOUR RIGHTS

You have the right to ask Check4Cancer not to process your information for marketing purposes at any time by contacting us at Check4Cancer.

You are entitled to access the information Check4Cancer holds about you. If you wish to do so, please contact Check4Cancer. Check4Cancer may charge a fee of £10 to meet it costs in providing you with details of the information it holds.

Our clients can be confident that their rights will be recognised and respected by all staff involved in their care regardless of their age, disability, race, religion, gender or sexual orientation.

CONTACTING CHECK4CANCER

If you have any questions about the use of the information Check4Cancer holds about you or have any other questions about this privacy policy, please contact Check4Cancer.

EMAIL COMMUNICATIONS

We do not encrypt emails, however PDF attachments such as appointment and result letters can be encypted by requesting it at the time of booking your appointment. Should you wish for encryption to added to these documents, you will be asked to provide a password, which will be used as the encryption key, and which will allow you to decrypt and or open them on receipt.

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_________________________________________________________________________________

 

WWW.CHECK4CANCER.COM

This website is owned and operated by Check4Cancer Ltd., a company registered in England and Wales under company number 06447912 and with a registered office at Lower Court 3-4, Copley Hill Business Park, Cambridge Road, Cambridge, CB22 3GN (“Check4Cancer”).

Your access to and use of this website are subject exclusively to these terms of use.

Check4Cancer reserves the right to:

change or remove (temporarily or permanently) this website or any part of it without notice and you confirm that Check4Cancer will not be liable to you for any such change or removal; and

change these terms of use at any time, and your continued use of this website following any changes shall be deemed to be your acceptance of such change.

DISCLAIMERS AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITY

This website and the information contained in this website (the “Check4Cancer Content”) are intended for information purposes only and do not constitute advice.

You should not rely on the Check4Cancer Content when making any decision, including but not limited to any decision relating to your choice of a screening. Check4Cancer recommends that you carry out your own investigations before choosing any screening listed on this website. Check4Cancer users should carefully consider the need for screening by consultation with their GPs.

Accordingly, the Check4Cancer Content is provided on an "AS IS" and an "AS AVAILABLE" basis without any representation or endorsement and without warranty of any kind whether express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of satisfactory quality, fitness for a particular purpose, non-infringement, compatibility, security, completeness and accuracy.

Check4Cancer makes no warranty that your access to this website will be uninterrupted or error-free, that defects will be corrected or that this website or the server that makes it available are free of viruses or anything else that may be harmful or destructive.

To the extent permitted by law, Check4Cancer excludes all liability for any loss or damage resulting from or arising out of or in connection with your use of or reliance on the Check4Cancer Content or the availability of this website or any other website linked to this website.

Nothing in these terms of use shall be construed so as to exclude or limit Check4Cancer’s liability for death or personal injury as a result of its negligence.

USE OF THE WEBSITE

You agree not to use this website for any purpose that is unlawful or prohibited by these terms of use or in a way that disrupts or restricts the use of this website by any other person, and not to upload, display or transmit any materials through this website that are offensive, defamatory, threatening, obscene, unlawful or that infringe the rights of any other person.

You agree that you will:

ensure that any details supplied to Check4Cancer in order to register for screening are accurate and to advise Check4Cancer if such details change;

not attempt to transmit through this website anything that contains a virus, worm, trojan or other harmful component;

keep confidential and not disclose to any other person or allow any other person to use any username and/or password you are supplied with by Check4Cancer to allow you to access and/or use this website; and

be responsible for any loss or damage resulting from the use by any other person of any username and/or password you are supplied with by Check4Cancer to allow you to access and/or use this website.

LINKS TO THIRD PARTY WEBSITES

This website may include links to third party websites that are controlled and maintained by others. Any link to other websites is not an endorsement of such websites and you agree that Check4Cancer is not responsible for the content or availability of any such sites.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS

All copyright, trademarks and all other intellectual property rights in the Check4Cancer Content (including without limitation the design, text and graphics of the Check4Cancer Content, all software and source codes connected with this website and any algorithms used by this website) are owned by or licensed to Check4Cancer.

You agree that you will:

access and use the Check4Cancer Content solely for your personal, non-commercial use provided that no trade mark, copyright or other proprietary notices contained in or appearing on the Check4Cancer Content are removed in whole or in part;

not download, copy, reproduce, transmit, store, sell or distribute any of the Check4Cancer Content without the prior written consent of Check4Cancer;

not reverse engineer, decompile, copy or adapt any software or other code or scripts forming part of this website; and/or

not change, modify, delete or misuse data contained in this website.

USE OF PERSONAL DATA

Check4Cancer will use any personal information you submit through this website, including but not limited to any information submitted through any of the forms that form part of this website, in accordance with its privacy policy [see above].

GOVERNING LAW

These terms of use are governed by English law. You submit to the non-exclusive jurisdiction of the Courts of England and Wales.

CONTACTING Check4Cancer

If you have any questions about these terms of use, please contact Check4Cancer.

SIGNING UP By signing up for this clinical service I understand that clinical information, including clinical photographs and scans, will be stored by Check4Cancer Ltd (Check4Cancer) (trading under BreastHealth UK, ProstateHealth UK, SkinHealth UK and Check4Cancer) and may be used in an anonymised way for educational, commercial or clinical publications. All abnormal results will be copied to your GP, if GP details have been provided, and Check4Cancer will follow up the results of any abnormal screening test to verify the final outcome.

If you have any questions about the use of the information Check4Cancer holds about you or have any other questions about this privacy policy, please contact Check4Cancer.

EQUALITY AND DIVERSITY

C4C provides a range of screening and diagnostic cancer services, as well as genetic counselling and genetic testing. A number of our cancer screening tests are only available to clients of a certain sex, age-range, family history or lifestyle history but clients will not be excluded on the grounds of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage or civil partnership, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. Certain tests are excluded from patients who are pregnant or breast feeding on clinical grounds, eg. screening mammography.

OVERVIEW This policy sets out our Privacy Policy and defines data processing of patient medical records in accordance with General Data Protection Regulations.

Background

Current data privacy legislation requires data controllers to provide data subjects with information relating to the processing of their personal data under GDPR Article 12.

Objectives

To provide data subjects with transparency about the information we collect and process, enabling them to provide informed consent.

Scope

This policy is applicable to all areas processing prospective patient information and patient records containing medical data.

Abbreviations and Definitions

GDPR General Data Protection Regulations 2018 ICO Information Commissioners Office EEA European Economic Area PHE Public Health England

‘pseudonymisation’ means the processing of personal data in such a manner that the personal data can no longer be attributed to a specific data subject without the use of additional information, provided that such additional information is kept separately and is subject to technical and organisational measures to ensure that the personal data are not attributed to an identified or identifiable natural person

Responsibilities

This policy applies to all staff, contract medical staff and contractors within the scope.  This policy is managed and maintained by the Senior Information Risk Officer under approval from the Clinical Services Director & Chief Medical Officer.

Equipment/Documentation

Not applicable

Business Details of Data Processor/Controller

Check4Cancer Ltd is a company registered in England and Wales under company number 8866941 and with a registered office at Lower Court 3-4, Copley Hill Business Park, Cambridge Road, Cambridge, CB22 3GN (“Check4Cancer”) and includes the following trading names, BOWELHEALTH UK, BREASTHEALTH UK, GENEHEALTH UK, GYNAEHEALTH UK, LUNGHEALTH UK, PROSTATEHEALTH UK, SKINHEALTH UK.

POLICY

Data Controller and Legal Basis

Check4Cancer Ltd is the Data Controller in relation to the personal and medical data we collect and process. On occasion, it maybe, we act as Joint Data Controllers, or Data Processors, under commercial or contracted arrangements. Where this is the case you will be informed at the point of processing. To process your enquiry, we require your consent in accordance with the GDPR Article 6 (a). Where you engage Check4Cancer for our medical screening services, we will be relying on GDPR Article 9 (a) and that we have recorded your explicit consent to process the data.

Collecting personal information

We may collect, store and use the following kinds of personal information:  (a) information about your computer and about your visits to and use of our websites including your IP address, search terms, geographical location, browser type and version, operating system, referral source, length of visit, page views and website navigation paths; (b) information that you provide to us when registering with our websites including your email address & contact details; (c) information that you provide when completing your profile on our websites, phone, online chat, or email including your name, address, gender, date of birth, relationship status, health records, employment records & payment details; (d) information that you provide to us for the purpose of subscribing to our email notifications and/or newsletters; (e) information that you provide to us when using the services on our websites, or that is generated in the course of the services we provide including appointment times, medical data, doctors contact details etc.; (f) information relating to any purchase of services or any other transactions that you enter into through our websites, online chat or directly through our contact centre including your name, address, telephone number, email address and payment card details; (g) information that you provide when responding to customer service feedback or complaints; (h) information contained in or relating to any communication that you send to us or send through our websites, email or telephone calls (call recording) including the communication content and metadata associated with the communication; and (i) payment data when purchasing services online or over the phone.  (j) medical information related to the results of any screening and/ or diagnostic services we provide at your request. (k) we may also record phone calls for the purposes of staff training, mitigation of disputes and the evidence of consent from data subjects.  Before you disclose to us the personal information of another person, you must obtain that person's consent to both the disclosure and the processing of that personal information in accordance with this policy. If consent cannot be reasonably obtained, or there is any concern around the capacity of the individual to give consent, we may decline to process your enquiry.

Using personal information

Personal information submitted to us through our websites, phone calls, emails or in person will be used for the purposes specified in this policy. We may use your personal information to:  (a) administer our websites and business; (b) personalise our websites for you; (c) enable your use of our medical screening services; (d) send you information; (e) process payments; (f) send statements, invoices and payment reminders to you, and collect payments from you; (g) send you non-marketing commercial communications; (h) send you email notifications that you have specifically requested that form part of the service; (i) send you our email newsletter, if you have requested it (you can inform us at any time if you no longer require the newsletter); (j) send you marketing communications relating to our business or the businesses of carefully-selected third parties which we think may be of interest to you, by post or, where you have specifically agreed to this, by email or similar technology (you can inform us at any time if you no longer require marketing communications); (k) provide third parties with statistical information about our users (but those third parties will not be able to identify any individual user from that information); (l) deal with enquiries and complaints; (m) keep our websites secure and prevent fraud; and (n) verify compliance with the terms and conditions governing the use of our websites (including monitoring private messages sent through our websites private messaging service). (o) we may contact you for the purposes of customer feedback and marketing testimonials. If you object to this processing, then please do let us know. We do not currently pass any of your details to external customer review services. If this changes in future, we will seek your consent prior to sharing your details. (p) we will not, without your expressed consent, supply your personal information to any third party for the purpose of their or any other third party's direct marketing. (q) all our websites financial transactions are handled through our payment services provider. We will share information with our payment services provider only to the extent necessary for the purposes of processing payments you make via our websites, refunding such payments and dealing with complaints and queries relating to such payments and refunds. (r) data supplied by you for the purposes of our medical services is stored in our outsourced data centres. The data is stored in the EEA and the arrangements are managed under contractand EU legislation that protect your data. (s) we do not use any automated decision-making processes or profile of you based on the data you provide, with the limited exception of processing family data related to your health profile.

Disclosing personal information

We may disclose your personal information to any of our employees, officers, insurers, professional advisers, consultants, agents, suppliers or subcontractors insofar as reasonably necessary for the purposes set out in this policy and in the delivery of our services.  Please note where you are referred to a clinic, hospital or consultant they may be acting as Data Controllers in their own right, as such you are advised to request copies of their Privacy Policy. For employees of corporate clients or customers of insurance providers,Check4Cancer will only provide information that a) a test has been performed for the purpose of invoicing for the test and b) statistical management information relating to the effectiveness of the testing.

For invoicing purposes and logistic of onsite clinics, it may be necessary to provide your name as evidence that a) a test has been conducted or b) providing attendee and non-attendee reports for onsite clinics.

The above data is always pseudonymised (see definitions clause 1.4).

Check4Cancer will never share identification data and the results of your screening with anyone.

We also send and receive information about you with the National Disease Registration Service (NDRS) at Public Health England (PHE) for the purposes of knowledge sharing and improving services to patients. PHE will provide Check4Cancer with cancer diagnosis data restricted to those cancers that we have clinical services for, as well as cancer staging and treatment data. This data is essential to allow Check4Cancer to perform a comprehensive and effective audit of all clients and patients who use our cancer screening and diagnostic services, and the anonymised data may be used for internal clinical reports that may be presented or published and compared to reference datasets or publications. You can find out more about the NDRS at PHE, and how they will process your data, here: https://www.ndrs.nhs.uk/ We may disclose your personal information to any member of our group of companies. This means our subsidiaries, our ultimate holding company and all its subsidiaries insofar as reasonably necessary for the purposes set out in this policy. We may also disclose your personal information:  (a) to the extent that we are required to do so by law; (b) in connection with any ongoing or prospective legal proceedings; (c) in order to establish, exercise or defend our legal rights including providing information to others for the purposes of fraud prevention; (d) to the purchaser (or prospective purchaser) of any business or asset that we are (or are contemplating) selling; and (e) to any person who we reasonably believe may apply to a court or other competent authority for disclosure of that personal information where, in our reasonable opinion, such court or authority would be reasonably likely to order disclosure of that personal information. (f) except as provided in this policy, we will not provide your personal information to third parties.

International data transfers

Your data will only be stored in the EEA or other jurisdiction where the European Council have given an adequacy decision. A list of these countries can be found here: https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/law-topic/data-protection/data-transfers-outside-eu/adequacy-protection-personal-data-non-eu-countries_en In very limited cases we may need to process your data in a jurisdiction that falls outside the above. These arrangements are managed either under contract or via a regulated framework i.e. EU-US Privacy Shield.

Retaining personal information

This section sets out our data retention policies and procedure, which are designed to help ensure that we comply with our legal obligations in relation to the retention and deletion of personal information. Personal information that we process for any purpose or purposes shall not be kept for longer than is necessary for that purpose or those purposes. Without prejudice to other obligations set out in this contract or legal obligations, we will usually delete personal data falling within the categories set out below at the date/time set out below: (a) personal & sensitive data of a medical nature will be deleted 10 years from the last communication date with the patient; or (b) when you ask us to erase your data compliant with GDPR Article 17; Notwithstanding the other provisions of this contract, we will retain documents & records containing personal data:   (a) to the extent that we are required to do so by law; (b) if we believe that the documents may be relevant to any ongoing or prospective legal proceedings; and (c) in order to establish, exercise or defend our legal rights (including providing information to others for the purposes of fraud prevention and reducing credit risk). There is no statutory period defined in legislation, so our retention period is based on recommendations from Information Governance Alliance Records Management Code of Practice for Health and Social Care 2016.

Security of personal information

We will take reasonable technical and organisational precautions to prevent the loss, misuse or alteration of your personal information. We will store all the personal information you provide on our secure (password- and firewall-protected) servers. All communications via our websites, payment transactions, electronic documents and database records will be protected by encryption technology. You acknowledge that the transmission of information over the internet is inherently insecure, and we cannot guarantee the security of data sent over the internet. You are responsible for keeping the password you use for accessing our websites confidential; we will not ask you for your password (except during authenticating access to electronic systems).

AMENDMENTS

We may update this policy from time to time by publishing a new version on our websites. You should check this page occasionally to ensure you are happy with any chanes to this policy. We may notify you of any changes to this policy by email. Please let us know if the personal information that we hold about you needs to be corrected or updated for example a change to your address or GP details.

YOUR RIGHTS

You may instruct us to provide you with any personal information we hold about you; provision of such information will be subject to:  (a) there is no payment required; and (b) the supply of appropriate evidence of your identity for this purpose, we will usually accept a photocopy of your passport certified by a solicitor or bank plus an original copy of a utility bill showing your current address. (c) we may withhold personal information that you request to the extent permitted by law. (d) you may instruct us at any time not to process your personal information as permitted by law. (e) you can instruct us to erase your data, compliant to GDPR Article 17. Please note, it is highly unlikely we will comply with any erasure requests of medical screening data given our statutory obligations.  (f) you have the right to lodge a complaint with the Data Protection Authority, if you consider your rights have been breached in anyway. The UK Data Protection Authority  can be contacted on the following link: https://ico.org.uk/global/contact-us/ 

THIRD PARTY WEBSITES

Our websites include hyperlinks to, and details of, third party websites. We have no control over, and are not responsible for, the privacy policies and practices of third parties if you register with them independently. 

COOKIES AND TRACKERS

Our websites use cookies & trackers. These currently include:

Double Click Privacy Policy https://support.google.com/adwords/answer/2549063?hl=en-GB Google Analytics & Translate Privacy Policy  https://policies.google.com/privacy?hl=en Zen Desk Live Chat Privacy Policy https://www.zendesk.co.uk/company/customers-partners/privacy-policy/

A cookie is a file containing an identifier (a string of letters and numbers) that is sent by a web server to a web browser and is stored by the browser. The identifier is then sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from the server. More information on cookies can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP_cookie Note: Deleting cookies can have a negative impact on the usability of many websites.

DATA PROTECTION REGISTRATION

Check4Cancer Ltd is registered with the UK Information Commissioner's Office & Care Quality Commission. Our registration detail can be found here: https://ico.org.uk/ESDWebPages/Entry/Z1201347  https://www.cqc.org.uk/location/1-1794403643?referer-widget4

OUR DETAILS

Our websites and call centre are owned and operated by Check4Cancer Limited. We are registered in England and Wales under registration number 8866941, and our registered office is at Lower Court 3-4, Copley Hill Business Park, Cambridge Road, Cambridge, CB22 3GN. Our principal place of business is at Lower Court 3-4, Copley Hill Business Park, Cambridge Road, Cambridge, CB22 3GN. You can contact us:

by post, using the postal address given above; using our website contact forms; by telephone, on the contact number published on our websites; or by email, using the email address published on our websites; by online live chat Or you can contact our Data Protection Officer directly by email at david@check4cancer.com; please note consent is granted for genuine customer enquiries, consent for any other purpose is NOT granted. 

 LIST OF APPENDICES

Not applicable

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If you would prefer a client service representative to call you back to discuss your requirements, please complete the form below.

We’ll be in touch very shortly.

You can also contact us by calling 0800 085 6616 or email us directly with your enquiry.

This information is not shared with any third parties and by submitting this form you agree to the terms of our privacy policy.

Healthscreen offering occupational and corporate health screening for breast cancer BreastHealth UK is part of the Check4Cancer group.   Check4Cancer provides innovative solutions for cancer detection and awareness in the workplace.

To find out more about our corporate services please visit the C4C website.

 

Regular breast screening can detect breast cancer early and save lives.

That’s why at BreastHealth UK we offer private breast screening to women of all ages, not just those between 50 and 70. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women under 35, so regular breast screening really can make a difference.

Our early breast cancer detection programme includes a range of private breast screening services personalised to individual women or men and is designed to provide rapid access to support.

The services range from fast track breast assessments BreastCheck to a variety of breast screening techniques, BRCA1 & BRCA2 genetic testing and IVF breast screening. We also offer breast cancer risk assessments and advice on managing your breast cancer risk.

Our private breast screening services are available across the UK to private individuals and to businesses.

Why choose BreastHealth UK for private breast screening?

BreastHealth UK has a team of specialists and consultants ready to address your concerns about breast cancer.

Key benefits of our service include:

Women and men of all ages will gain a better understanding of breast cancer Unlike the NHS, you can use our private breast screening even if you are under 50 Your breast cancer risk will be assessed through family history and lifestyle to allow a screening programme that is appropriate for your risk. You will become more aware of your own breast health and ongoing screening requirements You will receive your results quickly You can use our services without GP referral (in most cases) You can arrange breast screening appointments at a time that is convenient to you. We have breast screening clinics across the UK so you can find a clinic close to home or work. We use the latest technology and techniques to ensure our breast screening is accurate and relevant. We offer occupational health screening so if you are an employer you can offer on-site/close to work screening for staff We ensure patient confidentiality throughout and are regulated by the Care Quality Commission

To speak to someone about your requirements or book an appointment then please contact us.

 

Current open positions:

 

Specialist breast nurses (who perform breast examination)

To view detailed description, please click on position you are interested in.

At BreastHealth UK we have chosen to become regulated by the Care Quality Commission whose job it is to check whether hospitals, care homes and care services are meeting national standards.

The Care Quality Commission ensures that a wide range of secondary and specialist health care services in England are meeting national standards and when you look up a service on their website, they show you their latest report on whether these standards are being met and offer you the opportunity to share your experience or report a concern.

You can view their website here: http://www.cqc.org.uk

In the box to the right you can see a live feed from the CQC website showing a summary of whether our service is meeting the essential standards of safety and quality. Please click on ‘See full report (or share your experience with us)’ to link through to our full profile page on the CQC website. Alternatively, you can click here to view our profile.

Reminder BreastHealth UK  

 

 

Breast Health Advice

{NEWS}

Find a clinic 

   

A Friendly Reminder

{COPY} The BreastHealthUK Team 

Video

Should you have any concerns as a result of your self-examination please contact your GP or contact BreastHealth UK here.

Appointments: 0800 085 6616

www.BreastHealthUK.com/reminder Find us on facebook BreastHealth UK, Lower Court 3-4, Copley Hill Business Park, Cambridge Road, Cambridge, CB22 3GN Company number 0644790. If you would like to unsubscribe from our monthly e-mail alert service please click here

Many breast abnormalities are first detected by women themselves through regular self-examination. At BreastHealth UK we actively promote monthly self-examination as it plays an important part in the early detection of any problems which may or may not lead to more serious health issues.

Our short video guide will help you to undertake a self-examination with complete confidence and highlights the correct techniques and tell tale signs for any underlying problems.

Please refer to our video guide frequently to ensure you are using the correct techniques.

Monthly alert service

As many women lead busy lives, remembering to self-exam at a certain time of the month is not always a top priority. At BreastHealth UK we have introduced a new service to send you a monthly alert by email to remind you of the optimum time to conduct your self-examination.

It’s simple to join up. Please enter the first day of your last period below. If you are post menopausal you can insert whatever date you want.

Sorry, but we can’t find the page you are looking for. Please take a look at the links below to find what you are looking for or return to our home page.

Appointments Breast Awareness Screening Benefits Brochure Download Testimonials Private breast screening prices FAQ News and blog Contact us

BreastHealth UK is part of the Check4Cancer group. 

Check4Cancer is the reliable and trusted provider of early cancer detection and genetic services in the UK. The Company offers rapid access to personalised screening and diagnostic services for anyone anxious about a possible cancer diagnosis, as well as genetic counselling and testing for patients at increased risk of hereditary cancer.

Check4Cancer services cover bowel, breast, cervical, lung, prostate and skin cancer.

Check4Cancer enables people to take ownership of their health, and that of their family, by providing cancer services that are innovative, validated and effective. The company’s team of cancer specialists has extensive clinical expertise, enabling Check4Cancer to provide award-winning services trusted by private individuals, leading UK insurance providers and the corporate sector. 

Founded in 2007, Check4Cancer’s nationwide, evidence-based services are supported by audit data and cover 87% of all new cancer incidence in the UK every year.

Check4Cancer helps combat one of the fastest growing areas of medical need, as cancer is predicted to impact 1 in 2 people by 2020 . 

BreastHealth UK combines the experience of leading breast surgeons, radiologists, genetic counsellors and other breast specialists from across UK with the latest approaches and techniques.

Professor Wishart Prof. Gordon. C. Wishart Clinical Advisor - BreastProfessor Gordon Wishart studied at Edinburgh University Medical School and trained in general, breast & endocrine surgery in the West of Scotland deanery. He completed a Cancer Research Campaign Research Fellowship at the CRC Beatson Laboratories in Glasgow in 1989 leading to award of a MD entitled “Aspects of multidrug resistance in breast cancer” in 1992. Following his initial appointment as a consultant breast & endocrine surgeon in Sussex in 1995, he moved to Cambridge in 1998 to develop the breast unit at Addenbrooke’s Hospital, now known as the Cambridge Breast Unit. As clinical director of the Cambridge Breast Unit (CBU) from 2005-2010 he played a significant role in developing the CBU as a breast centre with a national and international reputation for research and clinical excellence. He was appointed as visiting Professor of Cancer Surgery at Anglia Ruskin University in 2008 and has an international reputation in the field of clinical breast cancer research. He recently led a team that developed and validated the new PREDICT breast cancer survival and treatment benefit model.   Vicki Kiesel Vicki Kiesel Genetic Lead  Vicki Kiesel is a registered and certified genetic counsellor. Vicki has worked within the field of oncology genetics for 7 years and is currently working within the NHS as a principal genetic counsellor, leading a team of genetic counsellors, and is also an honorary clinical lecturer. She teaches cancer risk assessment to allied healthcare professionals and is a mentor to genetic counsellors. She has worked with numerous specialists in the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary cancer and her work on genetics has been published. Vicki previously led the oncology genetics department at Stamford Hospital in the US and launched the first colorectal cancer registry in the state of Conneticut.

The most common symptom of male breast cancer is a hard, painless lump in the breast. The lump is usually located underneath the nipple and areola (the dark skin around the nipple) and some cases the lump can be painful.

Other male breast cancer symptoms may include:

The nipple is hard or inflamed

Oozing from the nipple (nipple discharge) that may contain blood

The nipple turns into the breast (nipple retraction)

Breast swelling

Lumps under the arm

A sore or ulcer in the skin of the breast

In most cases the above symptoms could well indicate a different problem and are not male breast cancer BUT, any symptoms should be checked by your GP or by one of our specialists as soon as possible.

If the disease has progressed and spread to other organs such as bones, liver and lungs (metastatic breast cancer), other male breast cancer symptoms may include:

Feeling tired all the time

Bone pain

Swelling of the lymph nodes near the breast

Nausea

Itchy skin

Shortness of breath

The key with any symptoms relating to the breast and nipple is to get them checked straight away. Early detection saves lives and improves outcomes.

Worried about male breast cancer symptoms?

If you are worried you may have symptoms of male breast cancer and would like to make an appointment then please contact us. We can arrange appointments and any treatment needed quickly without the wait to see a GP.

See other pages on this site about breast cancer in menfor further information.

Many women spot the symptoms of breast cancer themselves by feeling a lump or noticing a thickening of the skin on their breast. Most breast lumps aren’t cancerous, but it is essential that any symptoms are reported quickly to your GP as early detection of breast cancer saves lives.

Whilst most women are aware that a lump may indicate breast cancer, they may not be so familiar with other symptoms that may occur. These can include:

Swelling or a change in shape of the breast. One may become higher or lower than normal.

Discharge from the nipple that may contain blood.

A swelling or lump in the armpits.

Dimpling or puckering of the skin on the breast.

A rash around the nipple.

Sunken, inverted or misshaped nipples.

A constant pain in the breast or armpit that is not related to your menstrual cycle.

How to be breast aware

The most important thing women need to do is to know what is normal for them. All breasts are different, so becoming familiar with your breasts is essential in being able to detect when something changes.

The key breast awareness advice for all women of any age includes:

Examine your breasts regularly.

Know what is normal for you i.e. how your breasts look and feel.

Act immediately if you detect a change. Don’t hope it will just go away.

Know how to examine your breasts.

Breast cancer symptoms and age

Whilst breast cancer does most commonly occur in women over 50, younger women shouldn’t be complacent and should check their breasts regularly. Teenagers and young women whose breasts are still developing will naturally notice changes in their breasts, but if you are concerned you should see a GP.

Women over the age of 70 should not assume because they are no longer called for regular breast screening by the NHS that they are not at risk of breast cancer. One in three women over the age of 70 develops breast cancer and, in this age group, knowledge of the symptoms of breast cancer is less well known.

If you are worried about breast cancer and would like to consider breast screening, then please contact us and we can advise the best course of action for you.

There are many factors that affect the survival rate for breast cancer in women, including the way the cancer was detected, the stage and grade of the cancer and the type of treatment.

The good news is that breast cancer survival rates are improving in the UK and have been for the last 30 years. This is largely due to screening, earlier diagnosis and improved treatments.

Breast Cancer Survival Rates for 1, 5 and 10 years

Cancer Research UK states that for women of all ages, with all stages of breast cancer and co-morbidities (i.e. where they may have other existing illnesses that affect the treatment offered), 95.8% will be expected to survive the disease for at least 1 year.

85% of women are expected to survive the disease for at least 5 years and 77% will survive for at least 10 years.

It is important to note that whilst people often think that once the 5-year stage is reached they are cured, it can be seen from the statistics that survival rates at 10 years are lower than 5, indicating mortality still increases beyond 5 years.

Age factors affecting breast cancer survival rates

The age at diagnosis can have a significant effect on breast cancer survival rates.

Women in their 50s and 60s have better outcomes than younger women and women who are older. This is due to the fact that younger women often present with faster growing tumours. The latest 5-year survival rates for women of different ages in England from Cancer Research UK are:

Age at Diagnosis

% Survival Rate

15-39

83.5%

40-49

89.1%

50-59

90.4%

60-69

90.1%

70-79

80.9%

80-99

68.5%

Breast Cancer Stages and Survival Rates

The breast cancer stage is a measure of the progression of the disease and how far it has spread beyond the tumour. It has a significant effect on breast cancer survival rates.

Doctors define the progression of breast cancer in terms of stages, with stage 1 being the earliest and stage 4 being the most advanced form of breast cancer. The stages define the size of the tumour, whether the cancer has spread to any nearby lymph nodes and whether the tumour has spread to other parts of the body (metastasised) e.g. bones, liver etc.

Cancer Research UK gives 5 and 10-year breast cancer survival rates for women in England diagnosed in the early 1990’s as shown below. The outlook will have improved since this data was collected.

Stage

5 Year % Survival Rate

10 Year % Survival Rate

1

90%

85%

2

70%

60%

3

50%

40%

4

13%

10%

This data clearly shows that detection of breast cancer in the early stages results in much better outcomes.

Breast Cancer Survival Rates for Men

Because the incidence of male breast cancer is so low, there is not enough data to provide accurate survival rate statistics. If you are a man with breast cancer, you should discuss outcomes with your GP or consultant.

BRCA mutations are often discussed in relation to breast cancer and refer to a mutation (alteration) in either of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.

A mutation causes an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer in families affected. Cancer Research UK states that the lifetime risk of breast cancer in women carrying the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation is between 45-90% which is why, if you have a family history of breast cancer, ovarian or prostate cancer, a breast cancer genetic test may be advisable.

It should be noted, however, that BRCA mutations are only responsible for approximately 5-10% of all female breast cancer cases, with typically 1 in 500 people in the general population carrying a mutation. Having the mutation does not necessarily mean you will develop breast cancer or ovarian cancer.

BRCA mutations can be inherited from either parent and passed on to male and female children. If one parent has the mutation, the child has a 50% chance of inheriting the gene regardless of their sex which is why it is important for men to realised they too are at risk.

Men have up to a 10% risk of male breast cancer and an increased risk of prostate cancer in they carry a mutation in BRCA2.

Diagram showing how the BRCA mutation can be inherited

Families with the BRCA Mutation may experience one or more of the following:

Family members where breast cancer was diagnosed before the age of 50 Several close relatives (e.g. sister, mother, brother) with breast cancer Ovarian cancer in at least one member of the family Members of the family with breast cancer in both breasts (bilateral breast cancer) Incidence of male breast cancer Members of the family with both breast and ovarian cancer Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry Increased incidence of other cancers such as prostate and pancreatic cancer

How is BRCA mutation testing done?

A blood or saliva sample is taken and used to identify whether you carry the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation. You are advised to undergo genetic counselling beforehand, where your risk and family history will be established and the implications of the results discussed and explained.

If you are of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage, there are three specific genetic mutations that can be tested that are most commonly found in people from this background.

Full BRCA testing can also be undertaken if required in the unlikely event that initial testing of the three specific mutations does not identify any risk.

What if I have a BRCA Mutation?

If your tests reveal you do carry the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation, it doesn’t necessarily mean you will develop breast or ovarian cancer. However, you will be at an increased risk and a number of measures can be put in place to help reduce this risk that may include:

Surgery Drug treatment More regular examinations and screening

If you are concerned about a family history of breast cancer, ovarian cancer or prostate cancer and feel you may be at increased risk of a BRCA mutation, please contact us today to discuss your options or see more information about BRCA genetic testing. 

Although much rarer than female breast cancer, male breast cancer can be more complex and often presents at a more advanced stage. There are about 400 men diagnosed with male breast cancer each year in the UK, compared with 50,000 cases of breast cancer in women.

As with women, the single biggest risk factor for breast cancer in men is increasing age. Most cases of male breast cancer are diagnosed between the ages of 60 and 70. Other risk factors are high oestrogen levels, exposure to radiation, a family history or recognised breast cancer gene in the family, obesity, chronic liver conditions, and a rare genetic condition called Klinefelter's syndrome.

Professor Gordon Wishart comments: “Because the male breast area is usually quite small, there is a greater risk of a tumour spreading to other parts of the body, which is why it is beneficial to catch it as early as possible. The diagnosis and treatment of a male breast cancer patient is similar to that of a female and may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy".

The most common symptom of breast cancer in men is a firm lump in the breast deep to the nipple. This is nearly always painless and other symptoms may include:

Oozing from the nipple (a discharge) that may be blood stained

Swelling of the breast

A sore (ulcer) in the skin of the breast

A nipple that is pulled into the breast (called nipple retraction)

Lumps under the arm

Male Breast Cancer Diagnosis

The OneStop Breast clinic diagnostic techniques used for detecting breast cancer in men are much the same as for women. Clinical breast examination, ultrasound and mammography are all available at BreastHealth UK and are suitable for identifying male breast cancer.

Male Breast Cancer Treatment

Most men diagnosed with breast cancer require mastectomy, often followed by radiotherapy to the chest wall area. Chemotherapy and hormone therapy may also be used following surgery. It should be noted that the exact type of treatment will depend on a number of tumour-related factors, including the size of the tumour, the presence of hormone receptors, and whether the tumour has spread to the lymph nodes. As with female breast cancer, if the cancer is caught in the early stages, a cure may be possible. This is why early detection is important as once the cancer becomes more advanced, the prognosis and survival will be worse and long-term cure may not be possible.

Worried about Male Breast Cancer?

If you are worried you may have symptoms of breast cancer or would like further advice, please contact us or arrange an appointment. We can book you in quickly without the need for a GP referral and you will have your results quickly.

Testimonial

A male patient, aged 50, contacted BreastHealth UK when he identified a lump just below his nipple; he said: “I have a busy working life and I just wanted to get it sorted out as soon as possible, I didn’t want to wait for a GP appointment and then wait again to be referred, it would have taken too long and I didn’t want it to play on my mind. BreastHealth UK organised a same day appointment with a qualified breast surgeon and I had a mammogram and an ultrasound later that day, as recommended by the consultant. I was very pleased with the speed of the service and the ease of access to qualified staff. For me, privacy and confidentiality were really important and I was dealt with in a very professional and sensitive way.” Fortunately for patient, the lump was benign, and he did not require any further investigation or treatment.

There are many breast cancer risk factors, including some that carry more risk than others, some that are lifestyle related and some that are based on family history/genetics. The key breast cancer risks include:

Age

Reproductive history

Hormones (oestrogen)

Breast density

Previous breast disease

Family history

Genetic inheritance

Lifestyle Factors (alcohol, obesity)

Age

Age is the biggest risk factor in breast cancer (after gender), with older women being much more at risk than younger women. This is why NHS screening programmes start at the age of 50.

Reproductive History

There are many factors related to reproductive history that affect the risk of breast cancer. Women in developed countries have a higher risk of breast cancer, largely as a result of the late age of first pregnancy, having lower numbers of children and less breastfeeding. The age when a woman starts her periods, the age at menopause, the number of children she has and the age at first birth can all affect risk.

Hormones

Hormone therapies, such as HRT and some high-dose oestrogen-only oral contraceptives, have been found to increase the risk of breast cancer. In both cases, the risk is temporary and will decline over a period of years after the treatment is stopped.

Breast Density

Breast density is strongly related to breast cancer risk, and breast tissue that is denser presents a higher risk. Breast density does have a significant inherited component but can also be affected by weight, menopause and the number of children a woman has had.

Family History

If you have a mother or sister who has had breast cancer, your risk factor is higher than that of a woman with no family history. The risk increases further if your relative was diagnosed with breast cancer under the age of 40.

If there are more than four female 1st or 2nd degree relatives within a family that have had breast cancer, there may be a genetic mutation of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Women with this mutation have a 50-80% chance of developing breast cancer before the age of 70. Find out more via our sister company GeneHealth UK.

99.9% of the building blocks that make up our DNA are the same, but a SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism, pronounced SNIP), is a single building block that is altered and kept through heredity. We now know of at least 77 SNPs that increase breast cancer risk and the more you have, the higher the risk. Analysis of all 77 can now be performed on a saliva sample, the result of which combined with a lifestyle and family history questionnaire provides a risk score, that can stratify women intodifferent levels of breast cancer risk. The risk score allows women at higher lifetime risk of breast cancer to start breast screening atan earlier age, and have more frequent screening, whilst women at lower risk require less screening. There is good scientific evidence to show that this risk-stratified type of breast screening is more effective. For more information on this test please view our page on MyBreastRisk.

Lifestyle Factors

There are many lifestyle factors that are found to increase the risk of getting breast cancer. They include:

Weight – being overweight or obese may increase the risk in post-menopausal women.

Physical activity – being physically active and remaining so may reduce your risk.

Alcohol consumption – increased alcohol consumption does increase your risk.

Radiation exposure – exposure to ionising radiation can increase the risk of breast cancer, and the risk is higher if the exposure occurred at a younger age.

More than 55,000 new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed each year in the UK, of which approximately 400 are in men.

This means that 1 in 8 women will develop breast cancer in their lifetime, and this risk is predicted to increase to 1 in 7 by 2024.

Fortunately, long-term survival rates have increased during the last 20 years as a result of increased breast awareness, breast screening, and the introduction of rapid access one-stop diagnostic clinics.

If breast cancer is detected early, there is a very good chance that it can be treated successfully. It is also important to be breast aware and know what is normal for you.

For more information, view our breast cancer symptoms page.

 

 

 

The risk of developing breast cancer is dependent on many different risk factors.

So to help you get an accurate assessment of your particular risk level, BreastHealthUK offers an online breast cancer risk assessment questionnaire based on the Tyrer-Cuzick risk estimation model.

This easy-to-complete online assessment will ask you a series of questions about your lifestyle, family history and other clinical and epidemiological factors to provide you with a personalised risk assessment score.

The questionnaire can be completed online in one sitting or you can save it and come back to it over a period of time.

Take the online breast cancer risk assessment >

Once you have completed your risk assessment, your results will be analysed. Youwill be contacted via telephone by one of our medical experts who will discuss your results with you and give you advice on further actions if required.

For details on the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment cost see our prices page. To arrange your registration and assessment please contact us.

Please note that the Breast Cancer Risk Assessment is NOT a genetic test for BRCA gene mutation. If you are interested in genetic testing please see our breast cancer genetic testing page for further information.

What happens if I am at high risk of breast cancer?

If you are found to be at a high risk of developing breast cancer, there are many things that can be done to reduce the risk including:

Increased screening

Drug therapy

Lifestyle changes

Our team will advise you of your options and any further follow up you may require. Contact us today to book your Breast Cancer Risk Assessment.

Download the BreastGene brochure

BreastGene incorporates the testing of the following genes:

Gene

Condition

Lifetime risk of breast cancer

ATM

ATM associated breast cancer

17 - 60%

BRCA1

Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

<85%

BRCA2

Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer

<90%

BRIP1

Hereditary breast cancer

20%

CDH1

Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

39-60%

CHEK2

Hereditary breast cancer

25%

PALB2

Hereditary breast cancer

20%

PTEN

Cowden’s syndrome

<85%

TP53

Li Fraumeni sydrome

49% by age 60

STK11

Peutz jeghers

45%

BreastGene is a genetic test for breast cancer. It examines, in detail, the DNA code for 10 genes which are known to cause an increased risk of breast cancer. It is performed on a blood sample and, if possible, it is always more informative to also test a relative who has had breast cancer.

What is hereditary breast cancer?

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK. Unfortunately, 1 in 8 women will develop breast cancer during their lifetime; with 80% being diagnosed after the age of 50. 1 in 868 men will also be diagnosed with breast cancer. This means that in the general population women have a 12-13% risk of breast cancer while men have a 0.1% risk. Most breast cancer occurs by chance, however approximately 5-10% is hereditary and in some families ovarian cancer can be genetically related to breast cancer. In families where breast cancer is hereditary it may be possible to find the genetic change (mutation) which is responsible for the cancer. This allows for appropriate cancer screening and risk-reducing options.

What are genes?

Genes are the body’s instructions and they determine how the body develops and is maintained. Some genes prevent cancer developing: if there is a mutation in one of these cancer genes, then the gene doesn’t work correctly and this causes an increased risk of cancer. Mutations in at least 10 genes can cause an increased risk of breast cancer and other cancers. However, we know that there are other genes which are also associated with breast cancer and research is attempting to understand these other genes.

How do I know if I am at risk?

Families with hereditary breast cancer generally show one or more of the following clues:

Several relatives with breast cancer Breast cancer diagnosed before the age of 45 Bilateral breast cancer (cancer in both breasts) Ovarian cancer Increased frequencies of other cancers such as prostate and pancreatic cancer Triple negative breast cancer Male breast cancer Jewish ancestry

It is important to be aware that hereditary breast cancer can be present on either the maternal (mother’s) or paternal (father’s) side of the family.

How can genetic testing help?

Genetic testing can help determine the risk of cancer within a family and guide appropriate cancer screening. Depending on the specific genetic risk different screening tests can be arranged and risk-reducing strategies can be considered.

What is BreastGene?

BreastGene looks at 10 specific genes which cause an increased risk of breast cancer. 

How does the test work?

BreastGene is performed on a blood sample and it usually takes 3-6 weeks to obtain the results. In addition, dosage analysis is used to look for large deletions (missing parts) and duplications (extra parts) of the genes. However, no test is 100% and it is possible that someone could have a genetic mutation which is not detected by this test. It is most accurate to perform genetic testing on a family member who has had breast cancer so that a possible genetic cause can be found in the family. If this is not possible, genetic testing can be performed on someone who has not had cancer, although if the results are normal this will not be as informative.

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What will the test show?

There are 3 possible results:

A mutation is found in one of the genes which is   known to increase the risk of breast cancer. Increased screening and/or risk-reducing techniques will be recommended. A genetic variation is found (known as a variant of uncertain significance or VUS), but whether or not this is the definite cause of cancer is unknown. Screening will be recommended based on the family history. No mutation is found. It is possible that there may be an undetectable mutation or a mutation in a different gene. Cancer screening may still be beneficial.

What does it mean if I have a mutation?

If you have a mutation this means that you have an increased risk of breast cancer and possibly other cancers. Your exact risk(s) will depend on which gene mutation has been found. Extra screening and/or risk- reducing strategies will be discussed. It will also be possible to offer predictive testing to other people in your family to see if they also have the mutation.

Screening: When someone has an increased risk of breast cancer it is usual for them to have screening using mammography and often breast MRI scans. The frequency and timing of mammography will depend on which genetic mutation is found. Screening for other cancers may also be needed and will be discussed if necessary.

Risk-reducing surgery: Unfortunately no screening is 100% effective and in some situations, people may wish to consider risk-reducing surgery to lower their cancer risk as much as possible. In particular, risk-reducing mastectomy to remove healthy breast tissue may be considered by some women. This is very much an individual decision and obviously needs careful consideration. If a woman wishes to consider this option, her breast surgeon can provide further information. Additionally, women with a BRCA mutation may consider bilateral salphingo-oophorectomy (removal of the ovaries and tubes).

Breast awareness: It is important for all women to be ‘breast aware’ which means becoming familiar with how your breasts look and feel. Many women have lumpy breasts, which naturally change depending upon the time in your menstrual cycle and therefore it is best to check yourself at the same time each month (mid- cycle). If you notice a change in your breasts it is important to seek medical advice.

Signs of breast cancer are:

lumps, thickening or bumpy areas changes in appearance, like puckered or dimpled skin discomfort or pain bloodstained nipple discharge a rash or red area on the nipple or areola that won’t heal, a change in your nipple position (pointing differently or pulled in).

Most of the time people with these signs will not have cancer but it is always important to get them checked out.

Other risk factors: Some hormonal factors have been suggested as breast cancer risk factors. In particular, it is known that early menarche (first period) and late menopause increase the risk of breast cancer. 

Breast-feeding lowers the risk of breast cancer, as does early childbirth (before the age of 30). It is known that the pill lowers the risk of ovarian cancer when taken for 5 or more years. However, there may be a slightly increased chance of developing breast cancer for women who take the pill for prolonged periods; this risk decreases once women stop taking the pill.

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk of breast cancer when used after a natural menopause however it may be helpful for women who have an early surgically induced menopause.

Lifestyle factors: It is known that a healthy diet can promote good general health and lower the risk of cancer. In particular, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding abdominal weight gain will lower the risk of breast cancer. Limiting alcohol intake and doing regular physical exercise will also lower the risk of breast cancer.

Financial issues: Some individuals may be concerned about difficulties obtaining insurance coverage following genetic testing. Currently, this is not a problem as there is a moratorium ensuring that individuals do not need to disclose genetic test results unless a very large policy is being taken out. This moratorium is valid until 2019. More information about insurance can be found at: http://www.abi.org.uk

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Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC):MutationsinBRCA1&BRCA2causehereditarybreastandovariancancer.Inthegeneralpopulation0.254%ofNon-Jewishpeopleand2%ofAshkenaziJewish people will have BRCAmutation. TheestimatedcancerrisksassociatedwithBRCAmutationsvaryhowever;BRCA1mutationsareestimated to cause up to an 85% lifetime riskof breastcancerand up to 60%risk of ovariancancer. MenwithBRCA1mutationsmayhaveaslightly increasedriskofmalebreastcanceraswellas  approximately a 20% risk of prostatecancer. WomenwithBRCA2mutationshaveuptoa90%lifetime risk of breast cancer and up to a 30%risk ofovariancancer.MenwithBRCA2mutationshavea5-10%lifetimeriskofdevelopingbreastcancer,and approximately a 40% risk ofprostate cancer.IndividualswithBRCA2mutationsalsohave an increasedrisk of pancreaticcancer and possibly othercancers. WomenwithBRCAgenemutationsshouldhave breast MRI from age 30 years and annual mammogram from age 40 years.Ovariancancerscreeninghas not beenshown to detect cancer sufficiently early to save livesandthereforesomewomenmayconsiderrisk-reducingsurgery. Menmaybenefitfromprostatecancerscreening with PSA testing. Occasionally, a baby willinherittwoBRCA2mutations and will therefore have thecongenitalcondition known as FanconiAnemia.

PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome / Cowden syndrome: Cowden syndrome causes bowel polyps, benign  skin lesions, benign breast disease, autism and other features. Individuals with Cowden syndrome   have an increased risk of bowel (9%), breast (85%), kidney (34%), thyroid (35%), and womb - also know as endometrial or uterine (28%) cancers as well as an increased risk of melanoma (5%). Colonoscopy, breast MRI, mammograms, renal MRI, skin examination and thyroid ultrasounds will be recommended. Risk reducing surgery may be considered.

Peutz Jeghers Syndrome (PJS): PJS causes polyps in the large and small bowel, as well as ovarian tumours and abnormal colouring of the skin, particularly on the lips in childhood. PJS causes an increased risk of bowel (39%), breast (45%), pancreatic (11%) and other cancers. Mammography, colonoscopy and other cancer screening tests will be recommended.

Hereditary diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC): HDGC causes a high risk of diffuse stomach cancer (83%) and lobular breast cancer (39-60%) as well as a probable increased risk of bowel cancer. Individuals with HDGC will be treated at a centre with expertise in the condition.  Increased breast screening with annual breast MRI and mammograms with be recommended. Some people also consider gastrectomy (removal of the stomach) due to the increased risk of stomach cancer) and bowel screening may be suggested.

Li Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS): Li Fraumeni syndrome is a relatively rare condition which causes a high risk of cancer in childhood and adulthood: approximately 1 in 5000 to 1 in 20000, people will have LFS. Li Fraumeni syndrome causes an increased risk of sarcomas, brain tumours, breast cancer (85% risk by age 60), adrenal cortical carcinomas and other cancers. Individuals with TP53 mutations have a 50% risk of developing some type of cancer by age 30 and a lifetime risk of up to 90%. Breast screening with MRI will be recommended. Individuals are also advised to avoid radiation as they have an increased radiation sensitivity.

ATM associated breast cancer: Approximately 1 in 200 people (0.5%) will carry a mutation in the ATM gene. Individuals with a mutation in the ATM gene have a moderately increased risk of breast cancer, as well as an increased risk of radiation-sensitivity. Increased breast screening is recommended. Rarely a baby may inherit an ATM mutation from their mother AND their father, in which case they will have the congenital condition called Ataxia- Telangiectasia (AT). AT causes uncontrollable movements (ataxia), immune defects, and an increased risk of leukaemia and lymphoma.

CHEK2: Mutations in the CHEK2 gene are found in 4% of families with hereditary breast cancer and cause a moderately increased risk of breast cancer as well as a possibly increased risk of bowel cancer. Very rarely individuals have been shown to carry 2 mutations in the CHEK2 gene which seems to cause a higher risk of breast cancer. Increased breast screening, and in some situations, bowel screening will be recommended.

PALB2: Mutations in PALB2 have been shown to cause an increased risk of breast cancer. The risk is  estimated to be approximately 35% although the risk is greater if there is a strong family history of breast  cancer (up to 57%) and our knowledge of PALB2 is rapidly increasing. Increased breast screening with mammography and MRI is recommended. PALB2 also causes a possible increased risk of pancreatic  cancer. Occasionally, a baby will inherit two 2 PALB2 mutations and will therefore have the congenital condition known as Fanconi Anemia.

NBN: Mutations in NBN are thought to cause a moderately increased risk of breast cancer. Increased breast screening with mammography is recommended.

How are these conditions inherited?

Genes come in pairs; we get one copy from our mother and one copy from our father. At present all known breast cancer syndromes are inherited in a dominant pattern. This means that if someone has a mutation in one copy of a gene then there is a 50% (1 in 2) chance that they will pass this onto their children. The risk of breast cancer can be inherited from either side of the family. 

Further information and support can be found at:www.breastcancergenetics.co.uk www.menagainstbreastcancer.org www.facingourrisk.org www.youngsurvival.org www.cancercare.org www.cancerresearchuk.org www.lbbc.org www.cancerbacup.org.uk

Our knowledge of cancer genetics is rapidly growing, and the information given summarises this to date. Please keep us informed of any significant changes in your family in the future as this may alter our advice to you. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

Price

At GeneHealth UK (our sister company) we offer genetic counsellors to assist you prior to any testing. Our counsellors will provide you with all the information you need to make a decision and will help explain the process of genetic testing to you. Our counsellors will also be available once you have had your testing to discuss your results and options.

The cost for BreastGene is £1400 which includes pre and post-test counselling.

If you would like further information and advice on genetic testing for breast cancer please contact our team today.

Book your consultation now

 

Download the BRCA1 and BRCA2 brochure

Individuals or families with a history of breast or ovarian cancer may want to consider BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic testing to understand the risk of hereditary breast cancer and hereditary ovarian cancer, and help decide what risk reducing measures to consider.

What is hereditary breast cancer?

Cancer is unfortunately very common, with 1 in 2 people developing cancer at some point in their lifetime. Breast cancer occurs in 1 in 8 women, with 80% being diagnosed after age 50, while ovarian cancer occurs in about 1 in 75 women. Men can also develop breast cancer although this is rarer, accounting for only 1% of all breast cancer. Most breast cancer occurs by chance, however about 5-10% is inherited. When breast cancer is inherited, it may be caused by a mutation (fault) in one of the breast/ovarian cancer genes, known as BRCA1 and BRCA2, or in a different breast cancer associated gene. Currently, we know that there are at least 10 genes which cause breast cancer.

Characteristics of Families with BRCA mutations

Families with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations generally have one or more of the following:

Several close relatives with breast cancer Breast cancer diagnosed before the age of 45 "Triple negative" breast cancer Bilateral breast cancer (cancer in both breasts) Ovarian cancer Increased frequencies of other cancers such as prostate and pancreatic cancer Male breast cancer Jewish ancestry

It is important to be aware that hereditary breast or ovarian cancer can be present on either the maternal (mother's) or paternal (father's) side of the family.

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What are genes?

We have approximately 25,000 genes in every cell of our body. Genes are our body’s instructions and determine how our body functions, develops and is maintained. Genes come in pairs and each gene has a code, which can be thought of as a long sentence with thousands of letters. Changes in this code can stop the gene working and are called mutations. Mutations in some genes, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can increase the risk of certain types of cancer because normally these genes prevent cancer by repairing mistakes in the cells.

How are BRCA mutations inherited?

Our genes come in pairs. This means that we inherit two copies of BRCA1; one from our mother and one from our father. The same is true for the BRCA2 gene. BRCA gene mutations can therefore be inherited from either parent. If a parent has a genetic mutation, there is a 50% chance that it will be passed on to each child.

Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations: Genetic testing is performed on a saliva or blood sample and analyses the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to identify mutations which are likely to lead to an increased risk of developing cancer. There are three different tests available depending on an individual’s personal and family history:

Predictive testing: In families where the BRCA mutation has already been found it is possible to test for just the familial mutation. If the mutation is not present, then the relative is not at increased risk of cancer.

Ashkenazi Jewish mutation test: In Jewish families it is possible to test for 3 common mutations. These mutations are responsible for 97% of BRCA mutations in Jewish families. Results will show the presence or absence of these 3 mutations.

Comprehensive BRCA sequencing: Comprehensive sequencing examines the entire DNA code of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in detail. It is preferable to test a living relative who has been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer first. When this is not possible an unaffected person can have genetic testing if they wish.

Genetic testing usually takes 3-4 weeks, at which point a follow up consultation is scheduled. There are three possible outcomes of comprehensive genetic testing:

A mutation is identified which is known to increase the risk of breast cancer and appropriate screening or treatment can be arranged. Predictive testing can be offered to appropriate relatives. A genetic variation is found, but whether or not this is the definite cause of cancer is unknown. Screening is based on the family history. No mutation is identified. It is possible that there may be a different genetic mutation in the family and therefore breast screening may still be required, particularly when an unaffected person has been tested.

When a family has a history of only breast cancer and no BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation is identified, there is usually no increased risk of ovarian cancer.

Cancer Risks Associated with a BRCA mutation

It is important to remember that not everyone who inherits a BRCA gene mutation will develop cancer and the estimated cancer risks associated with BRCA mutations vary. BRCA1 mutations are estimated to have up to an 85% risk of breast cancer and up to a 60% risk of ovarian cancer. Men with BRCA1 mutations have approximately a 20% risk of prostate cancer. Women with BRCA2 mutations have up to a 90% risk of breast cancer and up to a 30% risk of ovarian cancer. Men with BRCA2 mutations have a 5-10% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, and approximately a 40% risk of prostate cancer. Individuals with BRCA2 mutations also have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer and possibly other cancers. Occasionally, a baby will inherit two BRCA2 mutations and will therefore have the congenital condition known as Fanconi Anaemia.

Early detection for women with BRCA mutations

Women with BRCA gene mutations should have annual breast MRI from age 30 and annual mammograms from age 40. It is also important for all women to be ‘breast aware’ which means becoming familiar with how your breasts look and feel and noticing any changes unusual for you. Many women have lumpy breasts, which naturally change depending upon the time in your menstrual cycle, and therefore it is best to check yourself at the same time each month (mid-cycle). If you notice a change in your breasts, it is important to seek medical advice. Ovarian screening has not been shown to be beneficial and therefore some women may consider risk-reducing surgery.

Preventative medication: The medications Tamoxifen and Raloxifene have been shown to lower the risk of developing breast cancer in BRCA2 carriers as well as women at increased risk, when taken for 5 years. These medications have some side effects and it is important to discuss these with a genetics expert or breast specialist, who should be able to discuss the benefits and side effects in detail.

Risk-reducing surgery: Some women who are found to have a BRCA mutation choose to have risk-reducing surgery to lower their risk of cancer. Surgery to remove the ovaries can be carried out from about 40 years of age, when women have completed their families and when the risk of ovarian cancer starts to increase. Removing a woman’s ovaries before the menopause is also known to reduce the risk of breast cancer. If a woman decides to have her ovaries removed before the menopause, she should consider taking hormone replacement therapy to help treat the symptoms. Risk-reducing surgery to remove healthy breast tissue (risk-reducing mastectomy) may also be considered by some women. This is a very individual decision and obviously needs careful consideration. If a woman wishes to consider this option, her breast surgeon can provide further information.  

Cancer Treatment

Individuals diagnosed with breast cancer who also have a BRCA gene mutation may consider having a risk reducing mastectomy to lower their risk of future breast cancer (usually around 50%). Certain chemotherapy treatments may also be tailored on the basis of a BRCA mutation. For example, platinum based chemotherapy and PARP inhibitors can be beneficial in treating cancer associated with BRCA mutations.

Women with ovarian cancer related to BRCA mutations may also benefit from these chemotherapies.

Early detection for men with BRCA mutations: Men with BRCA mutations should be breast aware and perform monthly self breast examination. Annual prostate screening with PSA tests should be arranged.

Hormonal Factors: Some hormonal factors have been suggested as breast cancer risk factors. In particular, it is known that early menarche (first period) and late menopause increase the risk of breast cancer. Breast-feeding lowers the risk of breast cancer, as does early childbirth (before the age of 30). It is known that the pill lowers the risk of ovarian cancer when taken for 5 or more years. However, there may be a slightly increased chance of developing breast cancer for women who take the pill for prolonged periods, although this risk decreases once women stop taking the pill. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk of breast cancer when used after a natural menopause, however, it may be helpful for women who have an early surgically induced menopause.

Lifestyle Factors: It is known that a healthy diet can promote good general health and lower the risk of cancer. In particular, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding abdominal weight gain will lower the risk of breast cancer. Limiting alcohol intake and doing regular physical exercise will also lower the risk of breast cancer.

Financial Issues: Some individuals may be concerned about difficulties with obtaining insurance coverage following genetic testing. Currently, there is a moratorium ensuring that individuals do not need to disclose predictive genetic test results. This moratorium is valid until 2019. More information about insurance can be found at: http://www.abi.org.uk

Further information and support can be found at:-

http://www.breastcancercare.org.uk/ http://brcaumbrella.ning.com/ http://www.breastcancergenetics.co.uk/ http://www.youngsurvival.org http://www.facingourrisk.org www.cancercare.org www.cancerresearchuk.org www.lbbc.org www.cancerbacup.org.uk www.menagainstbreastcancer.org

Our knowledge of cancer genetics is rapidly growing, and the information given summarises this to date. Please keep us informed of any significant changes in your family in the future as this may alter our advice to you. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

Book your consultation now

If you would like further information and advice on BRCA1 and BRCA2 and breast cancer genetic testing please contact our team today.

What is genetic counselling?

Individuals with a family history of cancer often have many questions, including: Am I at risk? Are my children at risk? And what can I do to detect or reduce my risk of cancer? Genetic counsellors aim to answer these questions and explain the underlying causes of cancer where possible.

What is genetic testing?

Genetic testing can help you understand the risk of developing cancer or passing it on to your children. It is a personal decision you should make in collaboration with your family, doctor, and genetic counsellor. Genetic cancer testing looks at the DNA code for a specific gene or genes. It provides information about the gene(s) which are analysed and is usually performed on a blood or saliva sample.

Genetic counselling and testing services are provided by our sister company GeneHealth UK. To find out more about our genetic services, please visit the GeneHealth UK website.

 

What is Mammography?

BreastHealth UK offers private mammograms for breast cancer diagnosis. Mammograms involve taking an x-ray picture of each breast and can detect cancer at an early stage before changes can be felt in the breast by you or your doctor.

Key facts:

During mammography, an x-ray is taken while each breast is being gently compressed - this may cause mild discomfort Mammography can be performed as early as age 35 depending on the level of risk This service is only available at specific locations - please call us for more information Mammography will not pick up all breast cancers 

Benefits of BreastHealth UK Mammography:

Rapid access appointments Highly experienced breast radiologists Reduced time to diagnosis, ensuring any treatment that is needed can be started straight away

Click here for frequently asked questions on Mammography

Contact us: 0800 085 6616 or info@BreastHealthUK.com

How much will it cost?

A private mammogram at a BreastHealth UK clinic costs £230.

Every year an increasing number of women seek IVF treatment in the UK and overseas.

Because the average age of women seeking IVF treatment is 36, most IVF clients find it difficult to source a specialist IVF breast screening report privately or from the NHS.

Now there is help at hand.

As the leading UK private breast screening clinic BreastHealth UK offers a unique IVF Screening Service in association with leading local breast nurses and surgeons. The IVF Screening Clinic offers :

A clinical breast examination

Tuition in breast self-examination

A consultation where all questions will be answered

Results letter 4-5 days after the appointment clients including the breast screening report and personalised breast screening programme.

In addition to above, IVF clients may also want to have a Breast Cancer Risk Assessment – see more details here.

If further investigations are required, such as a mammogram or breast ultrasound. These will be organised as quickly as possible privately or you may be referred to the NHS.

View an article in the Daily Mail on IVF and breast cancer

Find your nearest clinic and prices (listed under each clinic)

Call us NOW for a rapid access appointment on:  0800 085 6616 

OneStop Breast Clinic provides you with fast track diagnostic investigations if you think you may have developed recent symptoms of breast cancer.

Fast appointments and results, no need for a GP referral.

Clinic locations nationwide.

Access to highly experienced and validated consultant breast surgeons. 

All diagnostic investigations at first appointment, so treatment can be started straight away.   

What is a OneStop Breast Clinic?

Our OneStop Breast Clinic is a fast track diagnostic clinic for men and women aged 18+ years who have noticed recent changes in their breasts, such as a breast lump, breast pain, nipple discharge or nipple inversion.

How do I book a OneStop Breast Clinic appointment?

OneStop Breast Clinic appointments can only be booked by telephone. Please call BreastHealth to speak with our dedicated customer care team (call centre hours are from 08.00 – 18.00). A OneStop Breast Clinic appointment costs £270 if you attend a London clinic OR £250 for clinics outside of London. Please note that if you require a breast ultrasound or/and mammography and/or needle biopsy, then these procedures will incur additional fees, which will be payable directly to the clinic. 

What can I expect at my OneStop Breast Clinic appointment?

OneStop Breast Clinics offer private breast investigations with triple assessment, providing thorough and accurate diagnosis of breast cancer. You will be seen by a highly experienced consultant breast surgeon and the triple assessment performed at your appointment will cover the following areas:

Clinical breast examination (included in the initial consultation fee of £250 or £270 in London). Breast ultrasound and/or mammography (additional fee if required). Needle biopsy if lump is found (additional fee if required).

What happens next if signs of breast cancer are detected at my OneStop Breast Clinic appointment?

If your breast biopsy confirms a diagnosis of breast cancer then if insured, you can have treatment by the private consultant breast surgeon who arranged your investigations or alternatively, you can be referred to the NHS for treatment via your GP.

Cancellation Policy

We’re pleased to cancel and re-schedule any appointments without penalty or administration fees up to 24 hours before your appointment. However, with less than 24 hours’ notice of cancellation, re-scheduling or non-attendance on the day does incur a 100% cancellation fee as we’ll be unable to re-use the time to support other clients. New appointments will be charged at the ‘self-pay’ rate of £250 (£270 for London clinics).

 

With 1 in 8 women being diagnosed with breast cancer and 90% of lumps found by women themselves, the importance of breast examination and improving breast awareness cannot be understated. This is why BreastHealth UK offers the BreastCheck service to women.

BreastCheck is only available in London.

 

Unlike the NHS breast screening service where you are not invited for screening until you are over 47, our service is available to women over the age of 18 and offers training and advice on breast self-examination.

The BreastCheck breast cancer examination involves:

Breast Cancer risk assessment carried out online at a time convenient to you. A clinical breast examination with a breast specialist nurse Education and tuition on self-examination with the opportunity to ask questions. A monthly automated reminder service to ensure you check your breasts regularly.

Breast Cancer Risk Assessment

The online breast cancer risk assessment is a questionnaire about your family history, health and lifestyle and is completed entirely confidentially via our secure website.

Appointment with Breast Specialist Nurse

Once you have completed your online breast cancer risk assessment, we will contact you to arrange an appointment at a convenient time and location with a breast specialist nurse.

The nurse will take you through your risk assessment and advise on any lifestyle changes you can make to reduce your risk. The nurse will also conduct a clinical breast examination and show you how to conduct self-examinations. This appointment is also an opportunity to ask any questions you may have.

BreastCheck is only available in London.

BreastCheck Reminder Service

The breast specialist nurse will also show you how to register for our automated breast self-examination reminder service so that you get a monthly email to remind you to examine your breasts so you can look out for any signs of breast cancer.

BreastCheck is designed to give you the skills to conduct your own self-examination and give you the opportunity to have your breasts examined by a specialist. It gives you peace of mind and the confidence to identify small changes in your breasts, and helps to ensure any problems are detected early when treatment outcomes are at their best.

Whats next?

If you are interested in the BreastCheck breast cancer examination service then please contact us to arrange an appointment or you can start by completing our online breast cancer risk assessment after which we will contact you. If you have further questions about BreastCheck please see our FAQ video on this page and you will also find answers to questions about breast cancer on our breast cancer FAQ page.

Get in touch with us: 0800 085 6616 or info@BreastHealthUK.com

Register for BreastCheck now

* BreastCheck is only available via our London clinics

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Opening Hours Monday - Friday : 08.00 - 18.00Weekends and Public Holidays : Closed

Opening Hours December 2015 Monday - Friday : 09.00 - 16.30 Christmas Eve : 09.00 - 12.30 Christmas Day : Closed Boxing Day : 09.00 - 16.30 Monday 28th : Closed New Years Eve : 09.00 - 12.30 New Years Day : Closed

BreastHealth UK is a part of the Check4Cancer group.

Check4Cancer LtdRegistered address:Lower Court 3-4Copley Hill Business ParkCambridge RoadCambridgeCB22 3GNCompany Number 08866941

Our team of breast cancer specialists have put together a set of commonly asked breast cancer questions and answers for you along with information about the specific breast screening services offered by BreastHealthUK.

If you can’t find the answer to any of your breast cancer questions please contact us. One of our team will be happy to help.

Q. How often should I check my breasts?

You should check your breasts on a monthly basis so that you become aware of any changes. You can set up an email reminder through our self-examination reminder service to prompt you to check your breasts. You can also get more information about self-examination and see a video on how to check your breasts on our breast self-examination page.

Q. At what age can I have a mammogram?

Mammograms can be performed on women who are 35 years old and above. For women under the age of 50, a mammogram is not as successful at detecting breast cancers due to the more dense breast tissue found in younger women. Women between the ages of 35 and 50 with a family history of breast cancer may benefit from annual mammography . For women over 50, a mammogram has a sensitivity (chance of detecting breast cancer) of around 85%.

Q. One of my relatives had breast cancer. How do I find out if I am at risk?

BreastHealthUK offers a number of services to help you understand your risk including:

Online breast cancer risk assessment that will provide an initial analysis. Your results will be discussed with you by one of our practice managers.

You can make an appointment with a genetic counsellor to discuss your situation.

You can undertake a full BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic test to identify if you carry a breast cancer gene. Watch our videos about genetic testing on the BRCA page.

Q. Can I have a mammogram if I have had breast implants?

Yes you can although breast implants can obscure the image so there may be a requirement to carry out other tests such as MRI or breast ultrasound.

Q. Can men get breast cancer?

Yes they can. Whilst rare, there are about 400 cases of male breast cancer diagnosed in the UK every year. Full information about the symptoms, detection and treatment of male breast cancer can be found on the male breast cancer page.

Q. I have discharge from my nipple, should I be worried?

A lot of women can squeeze some discharge from their nipples, particularly if they have had children, and discharge can be caused by many things causes including duct ectasia. Bloodstained nipple discharge is rarely a sign of breast cancer (approx. 5%). However, if you have discharge without squeezing or the discharge is blood-stained you are advised to consult your GP or contact us for an immediate breast assessment.

Q. Can I get a genetic test for breast cancer?

Yes you can. BreastHealth UK offers a complete genetic testing service including counselling for people with a family history of breast cancer. This can range from a simple breast cancer risk assessment to full BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene testing. Please see our BRCA page for more information.

Q. Can benign cysts become cancerous?

Cysts are common in women and rarely turn into cancer but you should ensure that what you think is a cyst, is actually a cyst. This is done by breast ultrasound +/- cyst aspiration under local anaesthesia. If you find a new lump that does not disappear within two weeks, even if you have a past history of breast cysts, you should attend a breast clinic for further investigations.

Q. What treatment is available for breast cancer?

There are many treatments for breast cancer including surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone/drug therapy. The treatment your doctor prescribes will depend on the type of breast cancer you have and how far the disease has progressed.

Q. What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The typical symptoms of breast cancer in women include:

A new lump or thickening in an area of the breast

Bloody discharge from the nipple

Dimpling of the skin on the breast

A new change in the nipple including it becoming inverted or changing shape

A lump or swelling in the armpit

A change in the shape or size of your breast

A rash on the nipple or surrounding area

For men, symptoms are very similar but please refer to our male breast cancer page for full details.

Q. What are the benefits of breast cancer screening?

There is no doubt that early detection of breast cancer saves lives. Breast screening can detect cancers in their early stages leading to better outcomes, less surgery and reduced requirement for treatments following surgery. See our page about the benefits of breast cancer screening for more information.

Q. If I have breast cancer, will I have to have my breast removed?

Not necessarily. In the majority of cases it is possible to remove the tumour without removing the entire breast (a wide excision or lumpectomy) and then treating with radiotherapy. This will depend on the size and location of the cancer. There will be some cases where mastectomy is still required but, in the vast majority of cases, breast reconstruction can be offered at the same time as mastectomy.

Q. How can I reduce my risk of breast cancer?

There are thought to be a number of lifestyle changes that may reduce your risk of breast cancer including:

Reducing alcohol intake

Weight reduction in postmenopausal women if overweight or obese

Breast feeding

Being physically active

Avoiding long term hormone replacement therapy during the menopause

Avoiding exposure to radiation sources

Q. What is the life expectancy of someone with breast cancer?

That will depend on a number of factors related to the exact type of breast cancer and how far the tumour has spread. The good news is that breast cancer survival rates have improved significantly over the last few years due to earlier detection and more targeted treatment options with 10-year relative survival rates close to 80%, and 20-year survival of approximately 67%.

Is Breast MRI Safe?

Yes. MRI examination poses no risk to the average patient if appropriate safety guidelines are followed. Do tell your doctor if you:

Are pregnant. Weigh more than 300 pounds. Are not able to lie on your front for 30 to 60 minutes. Have claustrophobia (fear of closed or narrow spaces).

How long does the breast MRI examination take?

Allow 1 1/2 hours for your MRI examination. In most cases, the procedure takes 45 to 60 minutes, during which time several dozen images may be obtained.

What happens before the breast MRI scan?

Personal items such as your watch, wallet -- including any credit cards with magnetic strips (they will be erased by the magnet) -- and jewellery should be left at home if possible, or removed prior to the MRI scan. Hearing aids should be removed before the test since they can be damaged by the magnetic field. Secured lockers are typically available to store personal possessions.

What happens during the breast MRI exam?

You will be asked to wear a hospital gown and to lie on your front during your breast MRI.

As the MRI scan begins, you will hear the equipment making a muffled thumping sound that will last for several minutes. Other than the sound, you should experience no unusual sensations during the scanning.

Certain MRI exams require that you receive an injection of a contrast material. This helps identify certain anatomic structures on the scan images.

Why do I need a breast ultrasound?

Breast ultrasound is used to:

Check a breast lump found on breast self-examination, clinical breast examination or mammogram. It is used to see whether a breast lump is fluid-filled (a cyst) or if it is a solid lump. A lump that has no fluid or that has fluid with floating particles may need more tests.

Check the breasts of younger women because their breast tissue is often more dense, and a mammogram may not show as much detail. 

Guide the placement of a needle or other tube to drain a collection of pus (abscess), take a sample of breast tissue (biopsy), or guide breast surgery. 

Monitor the growth of a cyst or guide the placement of a needle to drain the cyst. 

Check your breasts if you have silicone breast implants or dense breasts. In these situations, a mammogram may not be able to see breast lumps. 

Find the cause of breast symptoms, such as pain, swelling, and redness.

How should I prepare for my breast ultrasound?

We suggest you wear a two-piece outfit so that it is easy to undress above the waist.Talk to the breast surgeon about any concerns you have about the need for the test, its risks, how it will be done, or what the results will mean.

How is the breast ultrasound done?

A breast ultrasound is done by a radiologist or breast surgeon.You will be asked to undress above the waist. You will be given a gown to drape around your shoulders and asked to remove all jewellery from around your neck.Gel will be put on your breast so the transducer can pick up the sound waves as it is moved back and forth over the breast. A picture of the breast tissue can be seen on a TV screen.A breast ultrasound test usually takes about 15 minutes. More time may be needed if a breast exam is done or if a biopsy is also planned. You may be asked to wait until a radiologist has reviewed the pictures. The radiologist may want to do more ultrasound views of some areas of your breast.

How will my breast ultrasound feel?

The gel may feel cold when it is put on your breast. You will feel light pressure from the transducer as it passes over your breast, but you should feel no discomfort unless your breast is tender because of fibrocystic breast changes, an abscess, or another infection. You will not hear the sound waves. A special Doppler ultrasound may be used to check the blood flow to the breast; you can hear the sound waves from this type of ultrasound.

What are the risks of breast ultrasound?

There are no known risks in having a breast ultrasound test.

When will I get the results of my breast ultrasound?

A breast ultrasound uses sound waves to make a picture of the tissues inside the breast.

The radiologist may discuss the results of the ultrasound with you straight after the test.

What affects the test?

You may not be able to have the test or the results may not be helpful if you have an open wound in the breast area.

What else should I know about breast ultrasound?

An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy may allow the breast surgeon to check a suspicious lump without surgery. An ultrasound does not replace a mammogram but it can be used to check a problem seen on a mammogram. It can also be used to show more detail in women who have dense breasts.

What is a screening mammogram?

A screening mammogram is an X-ray of the breast used to detect breast changes in women who have no signs or symptoms of breast cancer. It usually involves two X-rays of each breast. Mammograms make it possible to detect tumours that cannot be felt. Mammograms also can find microcalcifications (tiny deposits of calcium in the breast) that sometimes indicate the presence of early breast cancer.

How are screening mammograms and diagnostic mammograms different?

A diagnostic mammogram is an X-ray of the breast that is used to check for breast cancer after a lump or other sign or symptom of breast cancer has been found. Signs of breast cancer may include pain, skin thickening, nipple discharge, or a change in breast size or shape. A diagnostic mammogram also may be used to evaluate changes found during a screening mammogram, or to view breast tissue when it is difficult to obtain a screening mammogram because of special circumstances, such as the presence of breast implants. A diagnostic mammogram takes longer than a screening mammogram because it involves more X-rays in order to obtain views of the breast from several angles. The technician may magnify a suspicious area to produce a detailed picture that can help the Clinical Director make an accurate diagnosis.

What are the benefits of screening mammograms?

Research has confirmed that routine screening mammography is effective from age 40, and can reduce the number of deaths from breast cancer. In women at moderate or high risk, annual mammography is effective from age 35 onwards.

What are some of the limitations of screening mammograms?

Even though mammography can detect tumours that cannot be felt, finding a small tumour does not mean that a woman’s life will always be saved. Mammography may not help a woman with a fast-growing or aggressive cancer that already has spread to other parts of her body before being detected.

What is a false negative in a mammogram?

False negatives occur when mammograms appear normal even though breast cancer is present. Overall, mammograms miss up to 20 percent of the breast cancers in older women that are present at the time of screening. False negatives occur more often in younger women than in older women because the dense breasts of younger women make breast cancers more difficult to detect in mammograms. As women age, their breasts usually become more fatty (and therefore less dense), and breast cancers become easier to detect with screening mammograms.

 

What is a false positive in a mammogram?

False positives occur when mammograms are read by a radiologist as abnormal, but no cancer is actually present. All abnormal mammograms should be followed up with additional testing (a diagnostic mammogram, ultrasound and/or biopsy) to determine if cancer is present. False positives are more common in younger women, women who have had previous breast biopsies, women with a family history of breast cancer and women who are taking oestrogen (for example, hormone replacement therapy).

What happens if mammography leads to the detection of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)?

Over the past 30 years, improvements in mammography have made it possible to detect a higher number of tissue abnormalities called DCIS. DCIS, or Ductal Carcinoma In Situ is the presence of malignant cells that are confined to the milk ducts of the breast. The malignant cells have not yet developed the ability to invade the surrounding breast tissue. DCIS does not usually cause a lump, so it cannot usually be detected during a clinical breast exam. However, mammography is able to detect 80 percent of DCIS cases. Some of these cases later become invasive cancers. It is not possible to predict which cases of DCIS will progress to invasive cancer. Therefore, DCIS is usually removed surgically. Until recently, DCIS often was treated with a mastectomy, but breast-conserving therapy (breast-sparing surgery plus radiation therapy) is now standard practice for many women with DCIS. Women who have been diagnosed with DCIS should talk with one of our partner breast surgeons to make an informed decision about optimal treatment.

What should women with breast implants do about screening mammograms?

Women with breast implants can continue to have mammograms. (A woman who had an implant following breast cancer surgery should ask her doctor whether a mammogram of the reconstructed breast is necessary.) It is important to inform the mammography facility about breast implants when scheduling a mammogram. The technician and radiologist must be experienced in X-raying patients with breast implants. Implants can hide some breast tissue, making it more difficult for the radiologist to detect an abnormality on the mammogram. If the radiographer performing the procedure is aware a woman has breast implants, steps can be taken to make sure that as much breast tissue as possible can be seen on the mammogram. Many women with breast implants complain over increased mammography discomfort compared with life before breast implants.

What is digital mammography?

Both digital and conventional mammography use X-ray radiation to produce an image of the breast; however, conventional mammography stores the image directly on film, whereas digital mammography takes an electronic image of the breast and stores it directly on a computer. This allows the recorded data to be enhanced, magnified or manipulated for further analysis.

How is digital mammography different from conventional (film) mammography?

The difference between conventional mammography and digital mammography is like the difference between a traditional film camera and a new digital camera. Aside from the difference in how the image is recorded and stored, there is no other difference between the two. In September 2005, preliminary results from a large clinical trial (research study) of digital versus film mammography were published. These findings show no difference between digital and film mammograms in detecting breast cancer for the general population of women in the trial.

Below is a full list of costs for BreastHealth UK services:

OneStop Breast Clinic Consultation: £250-£270OneStop Breast Clinics offer private breast screening with triple assessment.An initial OneStop Breast Clinic consultation costs £250 (£270 in London).Ultrasound, mammography, biopsy, pathology, cyst aspiration and any other follow-up procedures that are recommended will incur additional charges directly from the hospital.

MyBreastRisk Kit: £295MyBreastRisk is an innovative yet affordable at-home kit to estimate your personal lifetime breast cancer risk.A MyBreastRisk kit, including a saliva DNA test, an online breast cancer risk assessment questionnaire and free genetic counselling for women at high risk, costs £295.

Mammogram: £230BreastHealth UK offers private mammograms for breast cancer diagnosis – this service costs £230

Please click here to view our cancellation policy

For any questions or to book your breast screening or BreastCheck appointment please contact us on 0800 085 6616.

For more information on BreastHealth UK’s breast cancer screening services, breast awareness, genetic breast cancer tests and IVF-related breast screening, feel free to download any of our brochures on this page and read or print them as you wish. 

Our BreastCheck brochure is currently being updated. Please contact us for further information.

My Breast Health - click here for download This leaflet is designed to give women information on breast awareness, what to look for and a reminder to check their breasts.

BRCA1 & BCRA2 - click here for download The genes called BRCA1 & BRCA2 have a significant connection to breast cancer and can often be difficult to understand. This BRCA genetic testing service, which includes genetic counselling, is available through GeneHealthUK and results are guaranteed within 6 weeks.

BreastGene – click here to download Our BreastGene service is a wider genetic test that examines 10 genes (including the BRCA 1 & BCRA 2 genes) known to increase breast cancer risk. The service is supported by genetic counselling. This brochure gives you more information.

IVF and your breast health - click here to download If you are planning fertility treatment, and in particular, egg transplantation, you may be required to have a breast examination. Though there is no proven link between breast cancer risk and the hormone treatments associated with fertility treatment, your fertility clinic may still require you to have a BreastCheck. This brochure explains our IVF breast screening service in more detail.

 

The main benefit of breast screening for women who undergo regular mammography is that breast cancer can usually be detected early.

Early detection is important because there is strong evidence to show that earlier breast cancer detection leads to improved rates of survival1. In fact, a recent research study shows that the risk of death from breast cancer can be reduced by almost 50% by participating in a breast screening programme2.

A further benefit of regular breast screening is that women whose breast cancer is detected early, and who subsequently undergo treatment, may be able to avoid having the entire breast removed (via mastectomy) and may have a better chance of avoiding extensive lymph node surgery.

Macmillan Cancer state that 70% of women whose breast cancer is detected early through screening can have breast conserving surgery, compared to only 55% whose cancer is detected outside a screening programme.

The evidence for the benefits of breast screening is clear. It is what drives BreastHealth UK in our work with leading UK breast surgeons to save lives through early breast cancer detection.

Breast screening options

Mammograms are the only validated form of breast screening and are undergone by millions of women each year.

Despite its ability to detect many symptoms early, mammography can miss some types of breast cancers, even when they present as a lump or thickening in the breast.

For this reason, it is important that you are ‘breast aware’ and perform your own examination of your breasts in addition to your mammogram, or that you take other steps to monitor your breasts for changes.

BreastCheck

For many women, self-examination can be difficult to perform and interpret. So for your assurance and peace of mind we offer the BreastCheck programme.

The BreastCheck programme offers regular clinical breast examinations with one of our specialist breast nurses as an effective way to monitor early changes in your breasts and help you in self-examination.

Make a BreastCheck appointment today by calling one of our client service managers on 0800 085 6616.

1Nystrom et al, Lancet 2002; 359:909-919

2Allgood et al, Br J Cancer. 2008 Jan 15:98(1):2006-9

Breast awareness is about becoming familiar with how your breasts look and feel, whatever your age, so that you can increase your chances of spotting breast cancer symptoms early.

Your breasts may change at different times during the month and as you get older, but if you are breast aware, you will be able to recognise if a change is ‘normal for you’ or not.

Examples of breast changes to look out for include:

A breast lump or thickening in the breast which is different to the rest of the breast tissue

Continuous breast pain in one part of the breast or armpit

One breast becomes larger or lower than the other breast

A nipple becomes inverted or changes shape or position

Changes in the skin of your breasts including puckering or dimpling

Swelling under the armpit or around the collarbone

A rash on or around the nipple

Discharge from one or both nipples

Remember the breast awareness five-point code:

Know what is normal for you

Look at and feel your breasts to look for any recent changes

Know what changes (such as breast lumps or thickening) to look for

Report any changes to your GP or breast specialist without delay

Have routine breast screening from age 47+

For a video showing how to self-examine your breasts please click here

If you are concerned about any of the above, contact us: 0800 085 6616 or info@BreastHealthUK.com

At BreastHealth UK our aim is to make the booking of your breast health or breast screening appointment as easy as possible for you.

Booking your breast health appointment

To make your appointment with BreastHealth UK, please call us FREE and in confidence on 0800 085 6616.

A member of our specialist breast health team will run through some personal questions with you to help determine the right type of appointment for you. You will be asked for your credit card details to confirm your appointment. We accept all major credit cards except Diners Card.

Once your appointment is made we will send you a confirmation letter with further instructions.

Cancellation Policy

We are pleased to cancel and re-schedule at any time, without penalty or administration fees, up to 24 hours before your appointment.

However, less than 24 hours’ notice of cancellation, re-scheduling or non-attendance on the day, does incur a 100% cancellation fee, as we will be unable to re-use the time to support other clients.

If you are running late for your appointment, please contact our administration team on 0800 085 6616 at the earliest opportunity and every effort will be made to accommodate you. We will always try to help, although we cannot guarantee a later appointment in the same clinic if you are late.

For any questions or to book your breast screening appointment please contact us FREE on 0800 085 6616.

 

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Rapid access appointments at nationwide clinics
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Highly experienced breast cancer specialists
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All investigations carried out on the same day
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